Published: Wed, November 15, 2017
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

Saudi-led coalition wants Yemen weapons checks strengthened before main port reopens

Saudi-led coalition wants Yemen weapons checks strengthened before main port reopens

Ports controlled by Yemen's exiled government would reopen soon, the coalition said on Sunday in a statement issued by the Saudi mission at the United Nations.

The Saudi-led coalition fighting rebels in Yemen shut down the country's entry points a week ago, after a missile attack was sacked by Houthis at Riyadh.

"The first step in this process will be taken within the next 24 hours and will include and involve the reopening of all ports and airports in areas controlled by the government of Yemen".

It says those ports are in Aden, Mocha and Mukalla.

The Saudi-led coalition was not immediately available for comment.

Al-Mouallimi said the Saudi-led coalition wants tougher inspections at the port of Hodeida, which is controlled by Houthi Shiite rebels, because current United Nations -monitored inspections only check large ships, and "in the case of small and medium-size ships there is hardly any inspection that takes place in the port or anywhere else".

Zarif's plan calls for "a ceasefire and an immediate end to all military operations, unimpeded urgent humanitarian and medical assistance to the people of Yemen, resumption of Yemeni-led and Yemeni-owned national dialogue, with the participation of the representatives of all political parties and social groups, and establishment of an inclusive national unity government".


The strike comes just a day after Saudi ambassador to the UN Abdallah Al-Mouallimi agreed to reopen some ports to allow aid in. And amidst all this, an unrelenting blockade on airports, seaports and highways of the country by the Saudi-led coalition is only making the situation far more worse.

The more the blockade tightens, he said, the more the Houthis will develop their abilities to "respond to the assault of the enemy".

Saudi Arabia and the USA have accused Iran of supplying the ballistic missile used in that attack.

But the military intervention, which has triggered widespread criticism from the global community, has left more than 10,000 people, most of which civilians, dead.

Meanwhile, Aden's port - which is controlled by allies of Saudi Arabia - does not have the capacity, according to the United Nations, to handle the necessary volume of humanitarian cargo and would mean hazardous cross-line deliveries.

The House of Representatives on Monday held its first ever debate over US military engagement in the civil war raging in Yemen and passed a non-binding resolution calling on parties to wage the conflict humanely and work toward bringing it to an end.

Houthi rebels in Yemen have launched fresh accusations on the Saudi-led military coalition over the bombing of Sanaa Airport which is Yemen's main global airport.

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