Published: Mon, November 13, 2017
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

United Kingdom parliament to get vote on final Brexit deal

United Kingdom parliament to get vote on final Brexit deal

In a bid to keep both Brexiteers and Remainers on side, Davis ended his appearance at the despatch box by describing the vote as "a meaningful vote, but not one that can undo Brexit".

"By announcing this bill, we are providing clarity and certainty - both in the negotiations and at home - about the final agreement being put into United Kingdom law".

"I welcome the announcement today that parliament will be asked to approve any withdrawal agreement by statute but it remains the case that the bill as drafted does not reflect what the government is now promising - and the bill will therefore have to be changed to meet the government's promise", he said.

"This also means that Parliament will be given time to debate, scrutinise and vote on the final agreement we strike with the EU".

And he said there would be no withdrawal agreement bill, or vote, if London can not strike a deal with Brussels.

Ten Conservative MPs had signed an amendment insisting the promised "meaningful vote" had to take the form of standalone legislation, threatening the Government with possible defeat. Tellingly, it comes as the government try to persuade Tory rebels to play ball over the EU Withdrawal Bill which returns to the House tomorrow - and this concession is aimed directly at an amendment to that nature from Dominic Grieve.

The UK parliament will be given the opportunity to vote on a final Brexit deal before the country leaves the EU, David Davis told MPs this afternoon.


Davis's move was seen as an attempted concession to Conservative rebels who may defy the government this week by voting against separate Brexit legislation transferring existing European Union laws to Britain.

She posted on Twitter: "Pointless if we have enshrined a drop dead date in the Bill, & get a deal at 11th hour!"

However, the offer was immediately attacked by both Labour and Conservative politicians, who expressed anger that it did not give parliament any say in the case of a no-deal Brexit.

Fellow Conservative MP Antoinette Sandbach similarly labelled the Government's promise "meaningless" should Brexit talks slip beyond March 2019.

Keir Starmer, Labour's Brexit spokesman, said the proposed law was "a significant climbdown from a weak government on the verge of defeat" in a series of upcoming lawmaker Brexit debates. "They have finally backed down", he said.

"However, like everything with this Government the devil will be in the detail".

Britain is due to leave the European Union in March 2019, regardless of whether MPs back or reject the proposed deal.

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