Published: Thu, December 07, 2017
Medicine | By Brett Sutton

New study indicates cheese is good for you

New study indicates cheese is good for you

Although many people look at cheese as a sort of "cheat food" due to its high fat content, a new research review suggests that it might not actually be that bad for you. Researchers say people who ate large amounts of cheese lowered their risk of developing heart disease by 14 percent and were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke compared to people who didn't eat cheese. It could be that people who eat cheese on a daily basis are healthier overall, or have more disposable income and higher socioeconomic statuses.

Until additional studies confirm such findings, it is important to remember that cheese is high in saturated fats, which can be harmful to heart health in high amounts. Those who got the most benefit were eating about a matchbook sized serving of cheese a day.

The 15 studies, which included 200,000 participants, were selected for analysis based on meeting the following criteria: the study design was prospective; the exposure of interest was cheese consumption; the outcome of interest was fatal/nonfatal CVD, CHD, or stroke; and RRs (relative risk) with corresponding 95% Cis (confidence interval) were reported or could be estimated.

Her take: Consuming saturated fat from real, whole foods (like dairy products) is better - and even possibly beneficial - in comparison to highly processed sources, especially ones that also contain partially hydrogenated oils. Importantly, they are observational, so they do not prove a causal association between cheese intake and better cardiovascular health.


"We're always are searching for ways to minimize heart disease and reduce atherosclerosis", said Allan Stewart, director of aortic surgery at Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Stewart was not involved in the study. But the benefits outweigh the bad when it comes to cheese.

Cheese contains vitamins A, K and D along with calcium, zinc, magnesium and protein.

"There is some evidence that cheese - as a substitute for milk, for example - may actually have a protective effect on the heart".

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