Published: Thu, December 07, 2017
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

North Korean missile threat forced Singapore Airlines to reroute flights

North Korean missile threat forced Singapore Airlines to reroute flights

Last week, North Korea launched a Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile that demonstrated a greater range than other missiles North Korea has tested.

On July 28 an Air France flight from Tokyo to Paris, carrying 323 people, passed just 60 miles from the splashdown site of a North Korean missile test, roughly five to ten minutes after it hit the water. Cathay Pacific's crew reported seeing the weapon re-enter the Earth's atmosphere, while Korean Air said its pilots "saw a flash".

Singapore Airlines has changed some of its flight routes between Asia and the U.S.in response to North Korea's missile tests, CNNMoney reported.

Singapore Airlines said its flights don't travel "in the vicinity of the missile trajectory" because of the route change it made to avoid the northern part of the sea between the Korean peninsula and Japan.

Daily flights between the South Korean capital, Seoul, and Los Angeles have been flying on a different flight path since July, a spokesperson for the airline told CNN Money on Wednesday.

In newly released report, Congressman Duncan Hunter (R-CA), a member of the House Armed Services Committee claimed that F-35 Joint Strike Fighters could shoot down North Korea's ballistic missiles in their boost phase.


The representative of the Ministry of defense Colonel Robert manning reported that the missile flew about 1,000 km before falling into the sea of Japan, reports Reuters.

Cathay said there was no current plan to change air routes, saying its plane was "far from the event location". "We remain alert and review the situation as it evolves".

Federal regulation from 1997 prohibits all US airlines from flying over the Flight Information Region of Pyongyang.

The International Civil Aviation Organization in October had condemned the missile tests as it threatened the safety of commercial flights but it had little effect on the North Korean regime.

Pyongyang, already subject to United Nations sanctions for its nuclear and missile programme, regularly fails to issue any warnings.

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