Published: Fri, February 02, 2018
Medicine | By Brett Sutton

Standing Instead Of Sitting All Day Could Help You Lose Weight

Standing Instead Of Sitting All Day Could Help You Lose Weight

The researchers analysed 46 previous studies involving 1,184 participants with an average age of 33; 60 per cent were men; and the average weight was 143.3 pounds.

Research explains that standing burns more calories compared to sitting.

Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez of the Mayo Clinic says even minimal activity throughout the day can help prevent heart attacks and stroke.

According to a new research, a person can lose weight by replacing sitting time with six hours of standing instead. The range across European countries is 3.2 to 6.8 hours of daily sitting time.

To find out, Lopez-Jimenez' team looked at data from 46 studies involving a total of almost 1,200 people.

Watching what you eat and staying active are the best ways to lose weight - but, let's be honest, they demand some hard work.

That might not seem like much, but it adds up over time.

Substituting time spent sitting for standing for six hours a day could help you shed almost half a stone, new research suggests.


First study author Dr. Farzane Saeidifard, a cardiology fellow at the Mayo Clinic, sums up the findings.

Over the course of a year, this amounts to losing 5.5 pounds (or 2.5 kilograms), and 22 pounds (or 10 kilograms) over the course of 4 years.

Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (NEAT)-a concept developed by the Mayo Clinic endocrinologists and obesity researchers-focuses on the daily calories burned by an individual while performing daily routine activities, not exercising. Standing still burns calories at a significantly higher rate, but when "fidgeting activity or walking-like activities or transitions between sitting and standing and standing and sitting" are factored into the effects of standing, it amplifies energy expended, she told CTVNews.ca in an interview.

More and more people are opting for standing desks at the office to reduce the adverse health effects of sedentarism.

"Our results might be an underestimate because when people stand they tend to make spontaneous movements like shifting weight or swaying from one foot to another, taking small steps forward and back. People may even be more likely to walk to the filing cabinet or trash bin", he said.

But Supariwala said it's often tough to get overweight, sedentary heart patients to get moving. As such, they surmise that it's possible for the gap between standing and sitting to be even greater.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on healthy weight loss.

Like this: