Published: Tue, June 12, 2018
Research | By Raquel Erickson

Bud heads toward Southern California as Category 4 hurricane

Bud heads toward Southern California as Category 4 hurricane

Infrared satellite imagery Tuesday shows the distinct 20 to 25 mile-wide eye, but also outer rainbands well removed from Bud near Puerto Vallarta, extending down the coast toward Manzanillo.

The Miami-based US National Hurricane Center offered similar data, but said it would start to slowly lose steam as it continues on a northwest track on Tuesday.

As of 5 p.m. ET, Bud had winds of 75 miles per hour and was moving to the northwest at 9 miles per hour.

As rain from Bud falls across the Southwest, the combination of steep, rocky terrain and localized heavy rainfall will raise the risk of isolated flash flooding, AccuWeather warned. A tropical storm watch has been posted for portions of Mexico's west coast.

The hurricane will churn up the ocean water along the Mexican coast, which could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions, the hurricane center said.


NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP flew over Hurricane Bud at about 4:45 a.m. EDT (0845 UTC) on June 11 and captured a night-time image of the storm.

Bud's centre is now about 350 miles south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, and is moving northwestward.

According to the latest National Hurricane Center forecast, Bud's center will begin to approach Los Cabos, at the southern tip of Mexico's Baja Peninsula, Thursday into early Friday. The storm categories, in increasing strength, are tropical depression, tropical storm and hurricane.

Bud will also create high seas and unsafe rip currents as it approaches land but is expected to begin to weaken before approaching Mexico's Baja California as a tropical storm later this week. The estimated minimum central pressure is 960 millibars.

The heart of the storm is expected to remain considerably offshore.

Like this: