Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Sport | By Wilson Duncan

NCAA passes significant transfer reforms, redshirt rule

NCAA passes significant transfer reforms, redshirt rule

Under previous rules, any participation in a game meant that a player's redshirt year, which offers them an extra year of competition at some point down the road, was used up.

This legislation should allow younger players an opportunity to receive valuable in-game experience without burning one of their four years of eligibility.

While it's unclear where most of the Class of 2018 stands in regard to early playing time, it stands to reason that down the stretch of this fall - as has been the case in the past - there will be players who can benefit from the four-game redshirt rule.

The NCAA has made several attempts in recent years to change transfer rules, but this is the first to come up with something substantive - if not comprehensive. The rule will put an end to a debatable practice wherein a DI coach would prevent an athlete wishing to transfer from contacting specific schools (usually rival schools).

Under the new system, a student can inform his or her current school of a desire to transfer, and then the school must enter that student's name into a national transfer database within two business days.

Nicholas Clark, a former football player at Coastal Carolina and a member of a student representative on the council, said the change promotes fairness and the well-being of college athletes.


Currently, an athlete must ask a coach for permission to contact other schools when choosing to transfer.

In what is becoming a landmark day for college football rule changes, the NCAA has altered its redshirt policy for the sport. A proposal was originally presented to the D-I Council in April, but tabled to allow conferences to provide feedback from spring meetings.

According to news announced on Wednesday, players will no longer need permission from their school to transfer, and further, individual schools will no longer be able to block recruits from transferring to a certain school. "Redshirt football student-athletes are more likely to remain engaged with the team, and starters will be less likely to feel pressure to play through injuries", said Miami athletic director and Division I Council chair Blake James in a statement.

Mid-year enrollees will not be allowed to participate in bowl games but, other than that, there are no limitations on the four games redshirt players can participate in. More often than not, it limited players from speaking to other schools in the same conference or on future schedules.

If another school tampers with student-athlete, it could be a Level 2 violation.

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