Published: Mon, June 11, 2018
Entertaiment | By Paul Elliott

Net Neutrality Is Officially Gone. Here's How This Will Affect You

Net Neutrality Is Officially Gone. Here's How This Will Affect You

The Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality went into effect today.

Supporters of net neutrality rules-which require internet service providers (ISPs) to treat all online content equally-are aiming to convince House Speaker Paul Ryan and additional Republicans to support a Congressional Review Act (CRA) that would overturn the FCC's party-line vote.

It was put in place by the Obama Administration but President Trump chose to scrap the rule in December.

The Obama-era federal regulations known as net neutrality are done - at least for now. The principle was born as regulators, consumer advocates and internet companies voiced concern about what broadband companies could do with their power as the gateway to the internet - blocking or slowing down apps that rival their own services, for example.

A statement by the pro net-neutrality group Fight for the Future declared: "June 11th will serve as the kick-off for intense campaigning focused on House lawmakers, who will be under tremendous pressure to support the [net neturality measure] ahead of the midterm elections, given that voters from across the political spectrum overwhelmingly support restoring these rules".

Under the new rules, the Federal Trade Commission will be the agency to handle complaints about broadband privacy and unfair or deceptive business practices by ISPs.


However, in the op-ed Pai does not defend against any of the common arguments for Net Neutrality. Lawsuits and "mass online actions" will slow the pace of any changes as companies will want to see how it all plays out.

Republican FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has accused Democrats of "scare tactics" in their opposition to net neutrality repeal. The disclosures are essentially a get-out-of-jail-free card-the new FCC regime specifically allows ISPs to block, throttle, or prioritize content in exchange for payment as long as the ISPs disclose the fact that they're doing so.

There is also 5G internet being rolled out later this year that will bring new wireless home internet options. Despite efforts from state officials and members of Congress, there will now be fewer rules governing how Internet providers can operate.

Hello "light-touch" regulation internet. But far more realistically, we're probably going to see some gradual shifts in our service over time, especially since Comcast backed down on its good-faith promise the day the repeal passed and has previously limited access to peer-to-peer applications. ISPs would only be punished by the FCC if they fail to disclose what the commission used to consider net neutrality violations. "That idea sits at the foundation of internet services, reflects how consumers enjoy the internet today, and despite claims to the contrary, has never truly been in jeopardy".

Pai, who is a former attorney for Verizon, doubled down on his stance that repealing net neutrality rules was the right call.

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