Published: Thu, August 02, 2018
Medicine | By Brett Sutton

Cannabinoid mice trial holds hope for pancreatic cancer patients

Cannabinoid mice trial holds hope for pancreatic cancer patients

On the other hand, Dr. Catherine Pickworth of Cancer Research UK appreciates the new research on tackling pancreatic cancer.

The evidence that CBD is effective for pediatric epilepsy has gained substantial traction recently, with 31 states allowing CBD-based medicines, and the approval of the drug Epidiolex, the first cannabis-derived drug to gain federal approval.

Mice with pancreatic cancer treated with cannabidiol (CBD) in conjunction with chemotherapy survived three times longer than those treated with chemotherapy alone.

Cannabidiol does not cause psychoactive effects, as opposed to tetrahydrocannabinol- the cannabinoid known to cause the psychoactive effects in cannabis. Clinical trials are needed to confirm whether or not CBD improves survival rates of pancreatic cancer patients.

Lead researcher Professor Marco Falasca from Queen Mary University of London said: "This is a remarkable result".

But, a new treatment could help to treble the average survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients, a study has revealed.


Scientists have found cannabidiol, often known as CBD, could extend patients' lives by a matter of years following research conducted on mice by Queen Mary University of London and Curtin University in Australia.

Professor Falasca said: "Cannabidiol is already approved for use in clinics, which means we can quickly go on to test this in human clinical trials".

Aside from boosting the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients, CBD also improves the quality of life of individuals going through chemotherapy by helping with the side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, among others.

However, The federal government intends to make only fresh or dried cannabis, and limited oils available upon legalization. Just over half the extracts were associated with a seizure reduction of 75-100 percent, which reinforces observations from animal studies and case reports of anticonvulsant effects of THC and THCA.

It also involved researchers from The Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Scotland.

The research was supported by the United Kingdom charity Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund and the Avner Pancreatic Cancer Foundation and also involved researchers from The Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Scotland. News is increasingly biased, corrupt, or agenda driven. Every penny we collect from donations supports vital investigative and independent journalism.

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