Published: Thu, August 09, 2018
Entertaiment | By Paul Elliott

Oscars to add best popular film award, shorten gala

Oscars to add best popular film award, shorten gala

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences's board of governors approved several changes to the annual Oscars show last night during their meeting Tuesday night in which they re-elected John Bailey to a second term as president.

While details on how movies will be put in the running for this new award have yet to be shared, their tweet reads that it's "being designed around achievement in popular film". There are no other details available about the award yet, including eligibility information, but the change is part of a continued effort by the Academy to keep the Oscars "relevant in a changing world".

To keep the ceremony to three hours, the academy vows to present only select categories live.

Such wins prove the Oscars have always favoured the popular film, Twitter thinks.

The Academy Board of Governors has yet to reveal more information about what kind of achievement will be recognized and what qualifies as a popular film, and the Academy did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

They have also set an earlier air date for their 2020 awards ceremony, telling fans to mark their calendars for February 9. And what criteria will be used to determine whether a film qualifies as "popular?"


What do you think of these changes coming to the Oscars?

The Academy announced it's adding a new category, shortening the broadcast and moving up the date of the 2019 show. So the upcoming Oscars will still be held on Sunday, February 24th, 2019 as planned - but the year after that, the broadcast will fall earlier in traditional awards season.

In order to fit all the awards into the new 3-hour timeslot, certain awards will be presented during commercial breaks.

Last year, the Academy Award for Best Picture was won by the The Shape of Water, which had taken about $170 million worldwide around the time of its win - twice the previous year's victor, Moonlight.

That last point would suggest that pressure for the changes has come as much from sections of the U.S. film industry as it has from the global television industry, for whom the Oscar telecast is an expensive, time-consuming exercise which, in recent years at least, has delivered diminishing commercial returns. The MTV Movie Awards? Here's what they had to say in a message sent out to members recently.

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