Published: Thu, August 09, 2018
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

Russian Federation warns of ‘horrible’ conflict if Georgia joins North Atlantic Treaty Organisation

Russian Federation warns of ‘horrible’ conflict if Georgia joins North Atlantic Treaty Organisation

Georgia's North Atlantic Treaty Organisation ambitions have been a source of anger for Russian Federation - which shares a border with ex-Soviet republic Georgia and does not want to see it join what it regards as a hostile military bloc - since 2008 when North Atlantic Treaty Organisation leaders promised Georgia it would one day join the alliance.

Medvedev added that NATO's expansion is a threat to Russian Federation.

After the war, Georgia entirely lost control of both South Ossetia and another separatist region, Abkhazia.

He also said that the 2008 August war "could have been avoided".

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Georgia expressed concern over the security situation in the occupied territories and the deterioration of the human rights situation there.

But Moscow recognised as independent the breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia, where it has stationed a large military presence ever since.

North Atlantic Treaty Organisation leaders discussed ties with Georgia at their summit in Brussels in July.


Foreign ministers from Lithuania, Latvia, and Poland, and Ukrainian deputy prime minister paid a visit to Georgia's breakaway region of South Ossetia on the 10th anniversary of the war.

According to Medvedev, the trade and economic cooperation between the two countries has picked up significantly over the past several years. However, countries with ongoing territorial conflicts can not join the Alliance, according to North Atlantic Treaty Organisation rules. The results of the referendum for joining North Atlantic Treaty Organisation supported 77% of Georgian voters.

While around 75% of Georgians said they were in favour of a possible Georgia's accession to North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, 81% voiced support for European Union membership.

Russian President Vladimir Putin had also said that he would view NATO's further expansion with Georgia and Ukraine "highly negatively".

But since 2008, when North Atlantic Treaty Organisation leaders promised Georgia it would one day join the European Union and North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, the Western dream of the small Caucasus country has been a source of anger for its northern neighbour Russian Federation.

Georgian soldiers observe terrain near Gori, Georgia northwest of capital Tbilisi in a file image from 2008.

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