Published: Sun, September 16, 2018
Research | By Raquel Erickson

Everything you need to know about Hurricane Florence

Everything you need to know about Hurricane Florence

Atlantic Beach on North Carolina's Outer Banks islands had already received 30 inches of rain, the U.S. Geological Survey said, while more than 25 inches have fallen in the Newport, Morehead City area since Thursday. At this time, Florence was a Category 1 hurricane. Storm surge flooding also could push 2 miles or more inland if Florence lingers for days along the coast.

However, a Cat 2 storm's wind speed is "extremely unsafe", according to the National Hurricane Center, capable of ripping trees from the ground, wreaking major roof damage on homes and causing power outages that may last weeks and affect three million households.

Previously classified as a Category 4 on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane strength, Florence is so far the most severe storm to threaten the USA mainland this year and the first of its magnitude to target the Carolinas since 1989 when Hurricane Hugo barreled over Charleston, South Carolina.

He urged people in the coastal Carolinas and living near inland rivers to evacuate. "Your time is running out". Its forward movement slowed to 12 miles per hour (19 kph) and top sustained winds stayed at 110 miles per hour (175 kph). Hurricane-force winds extended 80 miles (130 kilometers) from its center, and tropical-storm-force winds up to 195 miles (315 kilometers).

Hurricane-like conditions are expected to arrive in the areas covered by warnings by Thursday night or early Friday. Storm surge is why many of you have been placed under evacuation and we are asking citizens to please heed a warning. That same area experienced risky flooding after Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

The police chief of a barrier island in the bull's-eye of Hurricane Florence is warning any stragglers who refused to evacuate that they are making a risky choice.

Storm to be "exceptionally bad news" if it hovers offshore Usually when a storm approaches the coast, forecasters can tell with ever-increasing accuracy who will get walloped. Don't get complacent. Stay on guard. "Today the threat becomes a reality". More than 1 million people had been ordered to evacuate the coasts of the Carolinas and Virginia and thousands moved to emergency shelters, officials said.


Forecasters said that given the storm's size and sluggish track, it could cause epic damage akin to what the Houston area saw during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago, with floodwaters swamping homes and businesses and washing over industrial waste sites and hog-manure ponds.

More than 22,600 people were housed in 150 shelters statewide, including schools, churches and Wake Forest University's basketball arena. "If I can't get back in a week, after a while they might turn on each other or trash the place".

He warned residents to be prepared for mass power outages that could last for days or weeks, echoing the sentiments shared by Duke Energy on Wednesday.

Two people died in Lenoir County.

Anxious about how the government will respond to Hurricane Florence's devastation?

Jenni Koontz, a photographer who shot the clip, wrote on Instagram at 12 p.m. Sept 13 that "the guy in the front end loader told me there is a hole in the road somewhere between the pier and Hatteras so I turned around".

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