Published: Sun, September 16, 2018
Sport | By Wilson Duncan

Stop Saying that Serena Williams is a 'Victim'

Stop Saying that Serena Williams is a 'Victim'

"For me, it's just who I am", she said, per Reuters.

The 20-year-old powered her way through the fortnight with the loss of just one set, culminating with a victory over her idol and 23-time major champion Serena Williams in the final.

For you to attack my character is wrong. That requires subjective analysis for which I'm unqualified (since I stopped watching tennis after growing exhausted of John McEnroe's constant on-court whining), but my inexpert impression is that men act out on court far more than women do. You are the liar. "I don't cheat to win, I'd rather lose!" You stole a point from me.

The 36-year-old had already had a point penalty for smashing her racquet and a code violation for coaching when she was penalised further for calling Ramos a "thief" and a "liar" in NY. If you're a female you should be able to do, even half, of what a guy can do, ' Ms Williams said. This is not right.

These standards are not applied to the young men my age who instead of being emotional, they are branded "passionate", instead of ranting are "speaking their minds" and if he speaks arrogantly speaks of his achievements he is said to be "confident" and an "ambitious" is not used as a complement. "It's because I am a woman, and that's not right". Viewers could not have guessed that she won by looking at her crestfallen, teary-eyed expression throughout the immediate aftermath of the match.

While Williams was fined $17,000, she had some very vocal support from the governing body.


In the post-match press conference, Williams suggested women are treated differently in the sport, saying: "I've seen other men call other umpires several things. We do not believe that this was done last night".

However, her success was overshadowed by controversy surrounding Williams, who was handed three code violations by Carlos Ramos before accusing the umpire of sexism.

One of the most controversial Grand Slam finals of all time divided tennis and triggered a debate about sexism in the sport, fuelled by Williams's assertion that Ramos would not have dealt with a male player in the same way. That enraged Williams, and her reactions started the process by which Williams ended up losing a point and a game for racket abuse and verbal abuse, respectively.

The outlier, intriguingly, is coaching, the issue which ignited this sorry saga.

Men were fined 344 times compared to 140 for "audible obscenity" and 287 to 67 for unsportsmanlike conduct.

The full breakdown is available here.

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