Published: Sat, October 20, 2018
Research | By Raquel Erickson

Chill Out - Maine Could Have A Milder-Than-Average Winter

Chill Out - Maine Could Have A Milder-Than-Average Winter

The Southeast, Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic all have equal chances for below-, near- or above-average temperatures.

Broadly speaking, "El Nino" refers to a climate effect caused by warming sea surface temperatures in parts of the Pacific Ocean. However, Halper said, it's not expected to be quite as strong as the El Nino that helped lead to the record warm 2015-2016 winter season.

No place in the U.S.is expected to experience cooler-than-average temperatures, according to NOAA.

The NOAA outlook covers the months of December, January and February, when the average high temperatures in Portland are 37 degrees, 31 degrees and 35 degrees, respectively.

California is likely to see hotter-than-average winter temperatures, while parts of Southern California could also get greater precipitation, according to NOAA.

In the winter, the NOAA said, typical El Nino conditions include wetter-than-average precipitation in the southern USA and drier conditions in parts of the northern U.S. During the winter, typical El Nino conditions in the US can include wetter-than-average precipitation in the South and drier conditions in parts of the North.


In fact, Halper said, nowhere in the U.S.is expected to be colder than normal; continuing a national trend over the past several years.

NOAA's Climate Prediction Center has released its Winter Outlook, which found that in December and February much of the United States will see above-average temperatures and that there's a 70 to 75 percent chance of El Nino developing. The chances are highest in southeastern Georgia and much of northern and central Florida.

- Warmer-than-normal conditions are anticipated across much of the northern and western US, with the greatest likelihood in Alaska and from the Pacific Northwest to the Northern Plains.

-Drier-than-average conditions are most likely in parts of the northern Rockies and Northern Plains, as well as in the Great Lakes and northern Ohio Valley. But in case you need some talking down, a new forecast from NOAA says that at the very least, it won't be a nightmare this year.

NOAA's winter forecast comes as the mercury is finally beginning to dip across most of the country after a summer that lasted well into October in the eastern USA, with temperatures into the 80s and even 90s. "Even during a warmer-than-average winter, periods of cold temperatures and snowfall are still likely to occur", the agency stated. The next update will be available on November 15.

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