Published: Fri, October 19, 2018
Research | By Raquel Erickson

NOAA’s winter forecast for JH looks warm and dry

NOAA’s winter forecast for JH looks warm and dry

According to NOAA, in ME, the three-month average snowfall in Portland, across December, January and February, is 14.8 inches, in Bangor 16.1 inches, and in Caribou, 23.4 inches.

Winter looks wet and especially mild for much of the country, thanks to a weak El Nino brewing, US meteorologists said.

Center Deputy Director Mike Halpert said in a statement a "weak El Nino" could bring "warmer, drier conditions to parts of the North".

A mild winter could be in store for much of the United States this winter according to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. Due to this, above-average temperatures look likely for the northern and western United States, Alaska and Hawaii.

Meanwhile, the southern-third of the US and much of the East Coast could be hunkering down for a wetter than normal December through January.

- No part of the U.S.is favored to have below-average temperatures.

The Climate Prediction Center's outlook seems to at least indirectly contradict the one released by the 2019 Farmers' Almanac, an annual Lewiston-based publication which uses a mathematical and astronomical formula created in 1818 to come up with long-range forecasts.


Drought conditions are forecast to stay put this winter in the Southwest, Southern California, central Great Basin, central Rockies, Northern Plains and portions of the interior Pacific Northwest. The chances are highest in southeastern Georgia and much of northern and central Florida.

But they are expected to get better in Arizona and New Mexico, southern parts of Utah and Colorado, the coastal Pacific Northwest and the Central Plains, NOAA said.

Hawaii, Montana, Michigan, parts of Idaho, Wisconsin, northern Illinois, Indiana and OH are forecast to be drier than normal, with the biggest likelihood in Hawaii, Montana and Michigan.

NOAA's seasonal outlooks give the likelihood that temperatures and precipitation will be above-, near- or below-average, and how drought conditions are expected to change, but the outlook does not project seasonal snowfall accumulations.

NOAA's winter forecast comes as the mercury is finally beginning to dip across most of the country after a summer that lasted well into October in the eastern U.S., with temperatures into the 80s and even 90s.

"Even on a warming planet", he said, "it doesn't mean winter goes away and it's never cold again". The next update will be available on November 15.

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