Published: Thu, November 08, 2018
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

The 2018 midterms were a historic night for women

The 2018 midterms were a historic night for women

ME and South Dakota also elected their first female governors with Janet Mills and Kristi Noem, respectively. There was a mix of people of all ages (including one girl genuinely thrilled to be spending her fourth birthday at the event), but overwhelmingly, the staff and volunteers and interns and supporters were young people, many of whom were engaging in politics for the first time and were so excited to be there, and so proud of the work they put in. In successfully overtaking the incumbent in the state's 3rd Congressional District, Davids also becomes Kansas's first openly LGBT candidate to win a major office. Others, like Massachusetts' Ayanna Pressley, were political veterans.

Overall, the number of Republican women serving in Congress next term will slightly dip, partially because some female incumbents and candidates lost.

Comparing how many of each party's women candidates won their seats, the Democratic women were more successful, particularly in the Senate and House races.

Progressive insurgent Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, 29, who overtook goliath Rep. Joe Crowley in the Democratic primary for New York's 14th Congressional District in a stunning upset, became the youngest woman elected to Congress in the nation's history.

Women in general had a record-breaking night in the House, with more than 90 of them expected to join the House's freshman class.

Women made history in the 2018 midterm elections.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's surprise victory in the June congressional primary in NY shook up Washington and the Democratic Party.

That means at least 117 women will serve in the 116th Congress, up from the current 107. "We ran to make change".


Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of MI became the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Sharice Davids defeated a Republican incumbent in Kansas to become the first openly LGBTQ woman to represent Kansas.

"The more Americans who vote, the more our elected leaders look like America", said former president Barack Obama, praising the record number of women, a surge in minority lawmakers and record voter turnout.

The first Muslim women have been elected to Congress, with Democrat Rashida Tlaib winning in MI and Ilhan Omar winning in Minnesota.

What is already the most diverse Congress ever will become even more so after Tuesday's elections, which broke barriers of race and gender.

Almost two years after women spilled out into the streets of Washington and in cities across the country in defiance of the inauguration of President Donald Trump, the United States is sending more women than ever before to the House of Representatives.

Blackburn will become the first woman to represent Tennessee in the Senate.

The Democrats have flipped the house while the Republicans will continue to hold on to the Senate following the midterm elections in the United States.

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