Published: Sat, December 08, 2018
Research | By Raquel Erickson

Christmas Dinner Rocketed To International Space Station

Christmas Dinner Rocketed To International Space Station

Elon Musk's company succeeded in its primary mission of sending a Dragon spacecraft on its way to the International Space Station to deliver supplies, but the first stage of the Falcon 9 launch vehicle appeared to lose control as it approached Landing Zone 1 at Cape Canaveral.

Groans filled SpaceX Mission Control in Hawthorne, California, as live video showed the first-stage booster spinning out of control, still high above Cape Canaveral.

Unfortunately, SpaceX suffered a malfunction when a grin fin hydraulic pump stalled and Falcone landed out to sea. Although it is nearly without a doubt too early to actually know if the booster is in good enough condition to ever fly again, Musk seemed to directly suggest that it could eventually relaunch in support of an "internal SpaceX mission", basically either Starlink or tech development. Moreover, when the rocket successfully landed on the court - delivering the ongoing mission of the SSO-A SmallSat Express more than 60 satellites from 35 partners to orbit - SpaceX experts also noted that the missile does not require any lengthy and complicated fix work, thereby indicating that subsequent start will be made, apparently, without any visible technical changes. That ticket gets viewers less than 3.5 miles from the launch pad and gives them a great view of the launch.

SpaceX в третий раз запустила ракету Falcon 9

It should arrive at the space station on Saturday.

Meanwhile, the Dragon spacecraft continues on its way to the space station, carrying fresh mouse food; new science and engineering experiments; and plenty of other goodies. According to NASA, the Rocket experiment will test the reliability in space of a dental glue activated by ultraviolet light, while the Groot experiment will explore an alternative method for watering plants in a zero-gravity environment. It's a badge of honor on the @SpaceX Dragon capsule, launching today! The crew-carrying version of Dragon is schedule to fly a test mission next month, and if all goes well, will carry astronauts to the station later in the year in what would be the first crewed flight from US soil since the space shuttles retired in 2011.

Based in Seattle, Washington, Spaceflight helps companies like SpaceX identify, book, and manage rideshare launches like the one on December 3. Newcomers Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, NASA astronaut Anne McClain and Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques will stay until June. The Dragon spacecraft, which had previously been used for the CRS-10 mission in February of 2017, carried more than 2,540 kg (5,600 lbs) of supplies and payloads.


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