Published: Tue, May 14, 2019
Worldwide | By Isabel Fisher

US man makes deepest-ever dive in Mariana Trench, discovers trash

US man makes deepest-ever dive in Mariana Trench, discovers trash

How deep is the Mariana Trench?

Mr Vescovo also saw angular metal or plastic objects, one with writing on it.

His dive took him 16 metres lower than the previous deepest descent in the trench in 1960.

"This submarine and its mother ship, along with its extraordinarily talented expedition team, took marine technology to an unprecedented new level by diving - rapidly and repeatedly - into the deepest, harshest area of the ocean", Vescovo said.

Sea creatures swim around part of a submersible lander, illuminated by the light of the submarine DSV Limiting Factor on the floor of the Mariana Trench, in a still image from video released by the Discovery Channel.

The team plans to visit the Tonga Trench next before going to the Puerto Rico Trench and then the Molloy Deep in the Arctic Ocean.

"Maybe I felt much more like Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard".

Victor Vescovo and his team are in the middle of the Five Deeps Expedition.

The United Nations estimates 100 million tons of plastic waste already occupies the world's oceans and large volumes of microplastic have been discovered in the intestinal tracts of deep-dwelling ocean mammals, UK's Telegraph newspaper reported.


After the conclusion of the dives, the submersible - built to withstand 1000 bars of pressure - will be given to researchers at science institutions to continue exploring the ocean's depths.

His double record-setting dive was part of a mission to explore the uncharted depths of the world's oceans, collect scientific samples, and look for new species. Previously, he climbed the highest peaks on each of the planet's seven continents.

The Five Deeps dive to Challenger Deep in the Pacific Ocean broke a new record.

The final challenge will be to reach the bottom of the Molloy Deep in the Arctic Ocean, which is now scheduled for August 2019.

The Limiting Factor submersible found its way to the deepest point on the planet, and some trash. According to the BBC, the pressure at the bottom of the ocean is equal to about 50 jumbo jets piled on top of a person.

The creative director of Atlantic Productions, Anthony Geffen, explained it is the hardest thing he has ever filmed, due to the near-freezing temperatures and pitch black the sub operates in. "That is the story of our species, and I am just so happy that even if in a small way, I have been able to contribute to forward progress".

"We also had to design new rigs that would go inside Victor's submersible and capture every moment of Victor's dives".

The dive series has helped the Five Deeps research team identify three new species of marine animals, including a type of long-appendaged Amphipod.

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